2014 ACE Announcement
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Luncheons

Monday

Monday

All-Convention Luncheon: Evolution, Time, Tectonics, Asteroids, Climate and the Trajectory of Earth Science

Date: Monday, 7 April
Time: 11:30 a.m.–1:15 p.m.
Location: Grand Ballroom
Fee: $60
Speaker: Kirk Johnson, The Sant Director, Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History

Details

The 21st century is unique in the 200,000 year history of humans on Earth. Over the last 200 years of the industrial revolution, our population has increased by 700% and now stands at 7.1 billion. Human creativity and ingenuity have created a phenomenal explosion of innovative science, technology and opportunity. We have become the first species to look back into deep time and the first to consciously plan the future. Petroleum and other fossil fuels have played a central role in this narrative. In this complex and rapidly changing world, we continue to be surprised by new discoveries in science and technology. Many findings are counterintuitive. It is a good time to have an open mind.

The AAPG Foundation’s Teacher of the Year Award will be presented during the All-Convention Luncheon. Join us as we congratulate our 2014 Teacher of the Year winner Heather McArdle from Mahopac High School in Mahopac, New Year. The annual Teacher of the Year award of $6,000 is given to a K-12 teacher for excellence in the teaching of natural resources in the earth sciences. The award includes $3,000 to the recipient’s school and $3,000 for the recipient’s personal use. In addition, the recipient receives an expense paid trip to the Annual Convention and Exhibition (ACE) to receive the award. Nominations for the award are submitted by the AAPG sections and the winner is chosen by selected members of the Foundation’s Teacher of the Year committee.

Tuesday

Tuesday

Division of Professional Affairs (DPA) and Association for Women Geoscientists (AWG) Luncheon: Exploration and the Oil and Gas Industry: Having a Positive Impact on People and the World

Date: Tuesday, 8 April
Time: 11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.
Location: Room 310
Fee: $50
Speaker: Susan Cunningham, Senior Vice President of U.S. Gulf of Mexico, Africa and Frontier Region, Noble Energy

Details

Access to affordable energy has framed the world’s economy. As the population has increased, concerns about the impact of mankind on the earth’s environment and climate have increased. As explorers and members of the oil and gas industry, it is important that we be thoughtful about how we seek to find and deliver energy to the world in which we live.

Susan M. Cunningham serves as Senior Vice President of U.S. Gulf of Mexico, Africa and Frontier Region for Noble Energy, a leading independent energy company engaged in worldwide oil and gas exploration and production. She has been with Noble since 2001 and brings more than 30 years of industry experience to her current position. Susan served as chairman of the Offshore Technology Conference in 2010 and 2011. She was elected to the board of Cliffs Natural Resources in 2005. She also has served on the boards of the Houston Area Women’s Center, the Houston Geology Society and the AAPG Advisory Board. Susan earned a bachelor’s degree in geology and physical geography from McMaster University in Ontario, Canada. She also has completed a management program through Rice University’s Office of Executive Development.


Field Studies in Earth Models: Past, Present and Perspective Practices

SEPM Business Meeting/Luncheon

Date: Tuesday, 8 April
Time: 12:00 p.m.–1:10 p.m.
Location: Room 332 A/B/D/E
Fee: $45

Details

Ole J. Martinsen is a sedimentary geologist working as senior global exploration advisor at Statoil. He received his doctoral degree from the University of Bergen in 1990 and was visiting assistant professor to the University of Wyoming from 1990-1992. He started his industry career in 1993 working North Sea exploration and later has spent most of his professional time working global exploration and exploration research. He has juggled his career between academic interests, senior management positions and advisory roles at Statoil and currently works primarily with global quality assurance of work methods and specific opportunities. Martinsen has published widely in various fields, edited several books and has won a series of prizes. He received the AAPG Robert R. Berg Outstanding Research Award in 2011 and is currently the co-chair of AAPG’s Distinguished Lecturer Committee. He was SEPM’s International Councilor from 2002-2004.

Field studies of modern sedimentary environments and rock outcrops are traditional methods in earth sciences to describe and interpret earth processes and their resulting record in terms of Earth evolution. For many scientists, it is the ground truth, for example, of subsurface interpretations. For centuries, these classic methods have been employed to analyze Earth and its plentiful geological record. However, to make these analyses fully applicable and meaningful to the complete range of uses and users, not least to solve future Earth energy issues, challenges have existed and in many respects still exist. The traditional approach has yielded results which both have a format and a type that is not easily used by researchers in neighboring earth science fields. Furthermore, integration by various earth sciences has not been possible and is not a tradition, yet, it no doubt leads to better interpretations and may be the requirement to develop knowledge and methods to solve any forthcoming energy challenges.

In the last two decades, technology has been developed initially for military uses and in other industries that facilitates quantification of and platforms for the integration of earth science data. Three main examples are remote sensing, laser scanning methods such as LiDAR and global positioning (GPS) technology. In addition to allowing for improved visualization of earth science data, the new technology naturally allows for enhanced and refined interpretations in many examples far beyond the particular earth science field the technology was employed within. While the technologies currently have developed far past their infancy, their earth science application and utilization has not. Sedimentary geologists, as an example, when doing field studies do not normally look beyond their own field of expertise or to other earth science communities for the significance of their study. The potential now lies to develop earth models that place geological field studies as an important element in “whole earth analysis”. Earth’s development and its energy resources result from a sum of plate tectonic, structural, climatic and sedimentary processes; in fact there is a progress towards “One Earth Science” where the common denominator is topography.

For sedimentary geology and exploration and exploitation of hydrocarbons the need is clear. To fully understand subsurface uncertainty, field studies represent ground truth of elements of the event space in basin, play and prospect analysis. But the need to integrate between subsurface data and field data is no less, not least to understand which part of the subsurface event space a particular field analogue represents. In addition, the integration with other earth sciences is a large upside to build more complete geological models for a basin or a play. Some of this work is well underway, but by no means complete.

Wednesday

Wednesday

Division of Environmental Geosciences (DEG) Luncheon: A Perspective From Dinosaurs on Climate Change

Date: Wednesday, 9 April
Time: 11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.
Location: Room 332 A/B/D/E
Fee: $50
Speaker: Anthony R. Fiorillo, Perot Museum of Nature and Science

Details

It is generally considered that the world is heading back into a greenhouse world at a rapid rate, but there is great uncertainty among modern climatologists regarding the effects of a warming Arctic. One method for gaining perspective is to look at greenhouse Arctic worlds in deep geologic time, such as the Cretaceous of Alaska. The Cretaceous of Alaska contains the richest record of dinosaurs and associated fauna and flora of any high latitude location in the northern or southern hemisphere. Rather than animals and plants having lived in lower latitudes and being hijacked to the Arctic through plate movements, detailed tectonic reconstructions show that these organisms existed within an ancient warmer polar world that had a mean annual temperature similar to that experienced between modern Portland, Oregon and Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Given societal concerns today about what a warming Arctic might look like, these warm Cretaceous polar floral and faunal assemblages uniquely provide details needed for modeling a warmer terrestrial polar ecosystem. We will explore the life of a unique Arctic dinosaur, Pachyrhinosaurus perotorum, a horned dinosaur cousin of the more famous Triceratops, as well as the lives of other dinasaurian denizens who inhabited Alaska some 70 million years ago. How it was that Pachyrhinosaurus petrotorum and so many other dinosaurs were able to not only survive but thrive in the ancient Arctic and what can this mean for the modern world?


Energy Minerals Division (EMD) Luncheon: The Future of U.S. Shale

Date: Wednesday, 9 April
Time: 11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.
Location: Room 310
Fee: $50
Speaker: Scott W. Tinker, Director, Bureau of Economic Geology; State Geologist of Texas; Professor, Jackson School of Geosciences, University of Texas at Austin; Director, Advanced Energy Consortium; past president of AAPG, the Association of American State Geologists and the Gulf Coast Association of Geological Societies

Details

Major oil and gas companies led the way in conventional plays but the story has been very different in unconventional plays, especially shale, where independents led the way in exploration and production of US shale gas. However, with increased shale gas production came lower gas prices and the price for acreage in these plays fell accordingly. Some independents adapted quickly and led the charge back into shales (i.e. Bakken, Eagle Ford), this time by targeting natural gas liquids and oil. Is the shale bonanza over? International opportunities exist in shales, but those carry higher costs and political risks. There are offshore shale gas and oil possibilities, but those require expensive infrastructure and new regulatory policies. But expanded exploitation of existing US shale gas plays remains an exciting option. Recent work on shale gas reserves and production by the BEG shows that significant economic drilling opportunities persist, but in the better quality and higher liquids areas. Hear more about shale opportunities by attending the EMD luncheon where the distinguished luncheon speaker will be Scott W. Tinker, an internationally renowned geoscientist and former AAPG President. Scott has given over 600 invited and keynote lectures in nearly 50 countries and most recently co-produced and is featured in the acclaimed documentary, Switch. Tinker has degrees from the University of Colorado (Ph.D.), the University of Michigan (M.S.) and Trinity University (B.S.).

 

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