100 Years of Science
Fueling 100 Years of Prosperity

The History of Petroleum Geology Committee will again hold its annual forum in a special session where we are commemorating the centennial of the AAPG with a series of high quality papers that run the gamut from the scientific foundations of petroleum geology before the founding of the AAPG, through the development of technologies and discoveries in our first century, with biographical sketches of key founding members, and the status and future of key scientific disciplines.

First in our planned agenda, Ray Sorenson will set the stage by outlining the exploration potential of North America in the middle of the century leading up to the founding of the AAPG. Then Jim McDonald will discuss the practical tools and beginnings of professional practice as the AAPG was formed. Next Bob Merrill will highlight the discovery of giant fields through the AAPG century.

Continuing, Dana Jurick will showcase the amazing professional career of AAPG co-founder Wallace Pratt, and Rasoul Sorkhabi will discuss Lewis G. Weeks and the “Oil Habitat” paradigm in petroleum geology. Also on a biographical note, Robbie Gries will honor three early AAPG women pioneers and how they contributed breakthroughs in the early 1920’s.

Returning to a focus on science and technology, Steve Tedesco will discuss the role of seeps in exploration since the start of the petroleum age, and finally Malcolm Ross will present his views on plate tectonics and paleoclimate modeling in exploration in the past, present, and into the future. It should be a great session, with time for questions and discussion!

The purpose of the Committee is to preserve and promote the history and heritage of the evolution of geological concepts and technologies used in the search for oil and gas worldwide, and honor the memory of the men and women who caused this evolution.

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The History of Petroleum Geology Committee will again hold its annual forum in a special session where we are commemorating the centennial of the AAPG with a series of high quality papers that run the gamut from the scientific foundations of petroleum geology before the founding of the AAPG, through the development of technologies and discoveries in our first century, with biographical sketches of key founding members, and the status and future of key scientific disciplines.

First in our planned agenda, Ray Sorenson will set the stage by outlining the exploration potential of North America in the middle of the century leading up to the founding of the AAPG. Then Jim McDonald will discuss the practical tools and beginnings of professional practice as the AAPG was formed. Next Bob Merrill will highlight the discovery of giant fields through the AAPG century.

Continuing, Dana Jurick will showcase the amazing professional career of AAPG co-founder Wallace Pratt, and Rasoul Sorkhabi will discuss Lewis G. Weeks and the “Oil Habitat” paradigm in petroleum geology. Also on a biographical note, Robbie Gries will honor three early AAPG women pioneers and how they contributed breakthroughs in the early 1920’s.

Returning to a focus on science and technology, Steve Tedesco will discuss the role of seeps in exploration since the start of the petroleum age, and finally Malcolm Ross will present his views on plate tectonics and paleoclimate modeling in exploration in the past, present, and into the future. It should be a great session, with time for questions and discussion!

The purpose of the Committee is to preserve and promote the history and heritage of the evolution of geological concepts and technologies used in the search for oil and gas worldwide, and honor the memory of the men and women who caused this evolution.

Panel_34916 Panel_34916 History of Petroleum Geology (AAPG) Sunday, 02 April, 2017 Sunday, 02 April, 2017 12:00 PM 2:45 PM http://ace.aapg.org/2017/technical-program/forums-and-special-sessions/history-of-petroleum-geology

Two “Discovery Thinking” Forums will be the seventeenth and eighteenth presentations of the AAPG 100th Anniversary Committee’s program recognizing “100 Who Made a Difference.” These Forums, co-sponsored by AAPG’s Division of Professional Affairs (DPA), will feature invited speakers who will describe major and significant discoveries.

A special tribute “Lessons in Exploration Creativity from a Decade of Discovery Thinking Forums” will start the morning program. Scattered throughout the morning and afternoon Forums, we will feature a few brief look back vignettes of representative landmark discoveries featured in Discovery Thinking Forums over the past decade. As a tribute to the accomplishments of more than 100 extraordinary men and women who have participated in these Forums, we will celebrate their successes and recall key lessons relevant to explorers today and in the future.

Each speaker and their colleagues overcame significant business, technical, and professional challenges. Topics to be discussed will include philosophy of exploration, stories from remarkable careers, professional insights, colorful anecdotes, and lessons learned on the path to success. As technology advances and young geoscientists enter our profession, the organizers see continued interest in forums such as these. These forums provide a venue for explorers to discuss the personal side of success and what has been called the “art of exploration.” As always, the audience is fortunate to hear the speakers share abundant technical data and insights derived from costly and hard won experience.

AAPG offers many technical sessions. “Discovery Thinking” forums fill an important gap in how technical and professional skills combine to turn prospects into discoveries. Speakers are encouraged to share personal stories about discoveries they know well, to bring forward appropriate technical data, and to address questions from the audience. As a resource to fellow explorers, many previous Discovery Thinking presentations can be found on the AAPG Search and Discovery website, under the Special Collection tab. http://www.searchanddiscovery.com/specialcollections/discoverythinking.html

This year, AAPG is pleased to present two Discovery Thinking Forums. The morning forum will celebrate New Discoveries in the Western Hemisphere and Gulf of Mexico. The afternoon forum will feature Significant Global Discoveries (outside of the Western Hemisphere). As a headquarters of many global exploration companies, Houston is a great venue to celebrate significant game changing discoveries in the western hemisphere and around the world.


Discovery Thinking Forum, Houston ACE April 3, 2017 (#17)
Chairs: Charles Sternbach and Paul Weimer

New Discoveries in the Western Hemisphere and Gulf of Mexico

  • “Lessons in Exploration Creativity from a Decade of Discovery Thinking Forums”, Charles Sternbach, President-elect AAPG
  • “Discovery of a Bolivian Foothills Giant Gas Field: Incahuasi”, Philippe Mallard, Total, SA.
  • “Redtail Field, A Thermal Anomaly on the Eastern Extension of the Colorado Mineral Belt, Denver Basin, Colorado, John Forster, Exploration Advisor, Whiting (and Mark Sonnenfeld, Mark Williams)
  • “Discovery of the Utica Shale—Update on an evolving giant”, Bill Zagorski, Chief Geologist, and Taylor McClain, Senior Geologist, Range Resources
  • “A Fresh Look to Exploration and Discoveries in Mississippi Canyon, Northern Gulf of Mexico”, Eric Zimmermann, Vice President – Geology, LLOG

Discovery Thinking Forum, Houston ACE April (#18)
Chairs: Charles Sternbach and Paul Weimer

Significant Global Discoveries

  • “The Future of Exploration- The Next Decade” Bob Fryklund IHS, Chief Strategist- Upstream and Pete Stark
  • “The Petroleum System of the Mauritania- Senegal Basin”, Dorie McGuinness, Exploration VP- Geology, Kosmos
  • “Opening New Oil Basins: A Pattern of Discoveries”, Angus McCoss, Exploration Director, Tullow
  • “The Greater Gorgon Area, Northwest Australia: Exploration to Production” Mike McLerie, Geophysical Advisor, Chevron Eurasia Business Unit
35055

Two “Discovery Thinking” Forums will be the seventeenth and eighteenth presentations of the AAPG 100th Anniversary Committee’s program recognizing “100 Who Made a Difference.” These Forums, co-sponsored by AAPG’s Division of Professional Affairs (DPA), will feature invited speakers who will describe major and significant discoveries.

A special tribute “Lessons in Exploration Creativity from a Decade of Discovery Thinking Forums” will start the morning program. Scattered throughout the morning and afternoon Forums, we will feature a few brief look back vignettes of representative landmark discoveries featured in Discovery Thinking Forums over the past decade. As a tribute to the accomplishments of more than 100 extraordinary men and women who have participated in these Forums, we will celebrate their successes and recall key lessons relevant to explorers today and in the future.

Each speaker and their colleagues overcame significant business, technical, and professional challenges. Topics to be discussed will include philosophy of exploration, stories from remarkable careers, professional insights, colorful anecdotes, and lessons learned on the path to success. As technology advances and young geoscientists enter our profession, the organizers see continued interest in forums such as these. These forums provide a venue for explorers to discuss the personal side of success and what has been called the “art of exploration.” As always, the audience is fortunate to hear the speakers share abundant technical data and insights derived from costly and hard won experience.

AAPG offers many technical sessions. “Discovery Thinking” forums fill an important gap in how technical and professional skills combine to turn prospects into discoveries. Speakers are encouraged to share personal stories about discoveries they know well, to bring forward appropriate technical data, and to address questions from the audience. As a resource to fellow explorers, many previous Discovery Thinking presentations can be found on the AAPG Search and Discovery website, under the Special Collection tab. http://www.searchanddiscovery.com/specialcollections/discoverythinking.html

This year, AAPG is pleased to present two Discovery Thinking Forums. The morning forum will celebrate New Discoveries in the Western Hemisphere and Gulf of Mexico. The afternoon forum will feature Significant Global Discoveries (outside of the Western Hemisphere). As a headquarters of many global exploration companies, Houston is a great venue to celebrate significant game changing discoveries in the western hemisphere and around the world.


Discovery Thinking Forum, Houston ACE April 3, 2017 (#17)
Chairs: Charles Sternbach and Paul Weimer

New Discoveries in the Western Hemisphere and Gulf of Mexico

  • “Lessons in Exploration Creativity from a Decade of Discovery Thinking Forums”, Charles Sternbach, President-elect AAPG
  • “Discovery of a Bolivian Foothills Giant Gas Field: Incahuasi”, Philippe Mallard, Total, SA.
  • “Redtail Field, A Thermal Anomaly on the Eastern Extension of the Colorado Mineral Belt, Denver Basin, Colorado, John Forster, Exploration Advisor, Whiting (and Mark Sonnenfeld, Mark Williams)
  • “Discovery of the Utica Shale—Update on an evolving giant”, Bill Zagorski, Chief Geologist, and Taylor McClain, Senior Geologist, Range Resources
  • “A Fresh Look to Exploration and Discoveries in Mississippi Canyon, Northern Gulf of Mexico”, Eric Zimmermann, Vice President – Geology, LLOG

Discovery Thinking Forum, Houston ACE April (#18)
Chairs: Charles Sternbach and Paul Weimer

Significant Global Discoveries

  • “The Future of Exploration- The Next Decade” Bob Fryklund IHS, Chief Strategist- Upstream and Pete Stark
  • “The Petroleum System of the Mauritania- Senegal Basin”, Dorie McGuinness, Exploration VP- Geology, Kosmos
  • “Opening New Oil Basins: A Pattern of Discoveries”, Angus McCoss, Exploration Director, Tullow
  • “The Greater Gorgon Area, Northwest Australia: Exploration to Production” Mike McLerie, Geophysical Advisor, Chevron Eurasia Business Unit
Panel_35055 Panel_35055 Discovery Thinking Forum - (AAPG/DPA) Monday, 03 April, 2017 Monday, 03 April, 2017 8:25 AM 11:50 AM http://ace.aapg.org/2017/technical-program/forums-and-special-sessions/discovery-thinking-forum

The Preservation of GeoScience Data committee (PGDC) within the AAPG is pleased to put on two displays as part of the exhibition/poster session at the forthcoming AAPG convention in Houston 2017. One display will be of Cores and the other of Data/Media.

Cores

Oil and 100 Gas discoveries over the last years have seen changes and shifts in the plays, traps and reservoirs over the decades. From marine, lacustrine, fluvial or aeolian sandstones, shelf carbonates, chalks and reefs, and even volcanics, to the present day oil “shale” deposits, the industry is forever seeking new and innovative sources from which to extract the much needed hydrocarbons to keep our world our moving and warm. The display of cores put on by the PGDC will attempt to represent the major reservoir and play types that have resulted in giant or significant oil and gas fields over the last 100 years. Each table will aim to display cores representing the significant play or reservoir types that were dominant during each decade or that typified the giant or major fields in that era. The cores will be displayed across ten tables, one for each decade, with posters behind each table to show the geology of the field or play from which the core is taken.

Data/Media

The PGDC proposes to put on a second display of data and media through the last 100 years. This will include examples of early logs and seismic on paper and film to show how the amount and format of data and information has changed. The display will also include examples of different storage media types including tape reels, cassettes, cartridges and disks that have increased in capacity as the demands from industry required more and more data to be stored. This display will be both nostalgic for the older members but also we hope of interest to younger members who may only have heard of 9-track tapes and VHS cartridges etc.

35056

The Preservation of GeoScience Data committee (PGDC) within the AAPG is pleased to put on two displays as part of the exhibition/poster session at the forthcoming AAPG convention in Houston 2017. One display will be of Cores and the other of Data/Media.

Cores

Oil and 100 Gas discoveries over the last years have seen changes and shifts in the plays, traps and reservoirs over the decades. From marine, lacustrine, fluvial or aeolian sandstones, shelf carbonates, chalks and reefs, and even volcanics, to the present day oil “shale” deposits, the industry is forever seeking new and innovative sources from which to extract the much needed hydrocarbons to keep our world our moving and warm. The display of cores put on by the PGDC will attempt to represent the major reservoir and play types that have resulted in giant or significant oil and gas fields over the last 100 years. Each table will aim to display cores representing the significant play or reservoir types that were dominant during each decade or that typified the giant or major fields in that era. The cores will be displayed across ten tables, one for each decade, with posters behind each table to show the geology of the field or play from which the core is taken.

Data/Media

The PGDC proposes to put on a second display of data and media through the last 100 years. This will include examples of early logs and seismic on paper and film to show how the amount and format of data and information has changed. The display will also include examples of different storage media types including tape reels, cassettes, cartridges and disks that have increased in capacity as the demands from industry required more and more data to be stored. This display will be both nostalgic for the older members but also we hope of interest to younger members who may only have heard of 9-track tapes and VHS cartridges etc.

Panel_35056 Panel_35056 Preservation of Geoscience Data Display Monday, 03 April, 2017 Monday, 03 April, 2017 8:30 AM 5:00 PM http://ace.aapg.org/2017/technical-program/forums-and-special-sessions/preservation-of-geoscience-data-display

Resource Exploration on Mars—Applying the Lessons from Earth

The Michel T. Halbouty lecture series — funded by the AAPG Foundation — is an ongoing special event at the AAPG Annual Convention and Exhibition. Lecture topics are designed to focus either on wildcat exploration in any part of the world where major discoveries might contribute significantly to petroleum reserves, or space exploration where astrogeological knowledge would further mankind’s ability to develop resources on Earth and in the Solar System.

As we look ahead to the adventure of sending humans to Mars, we are faced with the question of how to sustain them. A key aspect of this is the exploration for, and definition of, strategic in situ resources, and developing the systems that would be required to take advantage of them. Critical lessons learned in the petroleum and mining industries here on Earth will need to be brought to bear.

David Beaty has been the Chief Scientist of the Mars Exploration Directorate at JPL in Pasadena, California for the past decade. His professional background is in geology, with a B.A. from Dartmouth College in 1975 and a PhD from Caltech in 1980. He spent the first half of his career in the resource industry here on our home planet, Earth. After leaving Caltech, he joined Noranda Exploration in the minerals industry and worked as an exploration geologist in the Rocky Mountain area, primarily searching for base and precious metals. In 1988, he joined Chevron at their research lab in La Habra, California, where he worked in support of diverse exploration and production projects throughout the world, including in the Permian Basin, the San Joaquin Valley, the Beaufort Sea, the North Sea and others. During his time at Chevron, Dave advanced into management, at different times leading both the geology and physical/chemical measurements divisions and overseeing a variety of exploration- and productionrelated research applications.

In 1999 Dave joined the NASA family at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. His role began with an assignment as project manager on a portion of the Mars Sample Return mission, but then to the Mars Program Office, first as Associate Chief Scientist, then as Chief Scientist. His responsibilities include oversight of the scientific productivity of JPL’s existing missions to Mars and also strategic planning for potential future Mars missions that are over the horizon. Most importantly, the latter includes the completion of the missions associated with Mars Sample Return, the design of the precursor missions needed to support the potential human exploration of Mars and planning for the scientific objectives and strategies for the future human explorers.

35069

Resource Exploration on Mars—Applying the Lessons from Earth

The Michel T. Halbouty lecture series — funded by the AAPG Foundation — is an ongoing special event at the AAPG Annual Convention and Exhibition. Lecture topics are designed to focus either on wildcat exploration in any part of the world where major discoveries might contribute significantly to petroleum reserves, or space exploration where astrogeological knowledge would further mankind’s ability to develop resources on Earth and in the Solar System.

As we look ahead to the adventure of sending humans to Mars, we are faced with the question of how to sustain them. A key aspect of this is the exploration for, and definition of, strategic in situ resources, and developing the systems that would be required to take advantage of them. Critical lessons learned in the petroleum and mining industries here on Earth will need to be brought to bear.

David Beaty has been the Chief Scientist of the Mars Exploration Directorate at JPL in Pasadena, California for the past decade. His professional background is in geology, with a B.A. from Dartmouth College in 1975 and a PhD from Caltech in 1980. He spent the first half of his career in the resource industry here on our home planet, Earth. After leaving Caltech, he joined Noranda Exploration in the minerals industry and worked as an exploration geologist in the Rocky Mountain area, primarily searching for base and precious metals. In 1988, he joined Chevron at their research lab in La Habra, California, where he worked in support of diverse exploration and production projects throughout the world, including in the Permian Basin, the San Joaquin Valley, the Beaufort Sea, the North Sea and others. During his time at Chevron, Dave advanced into management, at different times leading both the geology and physical/chemical measurements divisions and overseeing a variety of exploration- and productionrelated research applications.

In 1999 Dave joined the NASA family at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. His role began with an assignment as project manager on a portion of the Mars Sample Return mission, but then to the Mars Program Office, first as Associate Chief Scientist, then as Chief Scientist. His responsibilities include oversight of the scientific productivity of JPL’s existing missions to Mars and also strategic planning for potential future Mars missions that are over the horizon. Most importantly, the latter includes the completion of the missions associated with Mars Sample Return, the design of the precursor missions needed to support the potential human exploration of Mars and planning for the scientific objectives and strategies for the future human explorers.

Panel_35069 Panel_35069 Michel T. Halbouty Lecture Monday, 03 April, 2017 Monday, 03 April, 2017 5:10 PM 6:00 PM http://ace.aapg.org/2017/technical-program/forums-and-special-sessions/michel-t-halbouty-lecture

How Seismic and Sequence Stratigraphy Have Advanced: 40 Years after AAPG Memoir 26 and 30 Years after SEPM Special Publication 42

In honor of the 100th Anniversary of AAPG, and in recognition of major contributions to the science of basin analysis and worldwide exploration, the ACE 2017 SEPM Annual Symposium will be jointly sponsored by SEPM and AAPG with a focus on the historical contributions, advances in and future of the science of sequence and seismic stratigraphy. This symposium is prompted by the 40th anniversary of the publication of AAPG memoir 26 and SEPM Special Publication 42, both seminal compendiums that captured the rapidly evolving science of basin stratigraphy and global implications for stratigraphic understanding, as well as forging linkages between stratigraphy, sedimentology and geomorphology. The oral session, which includes invited talks from R. Mitchum, K. Bohacs, R. Sarg, H. Posamentier, G. Eberli and a raft of other prominent names in both research and application of these concepts, will be followed the next day with a poster session on the theme on Wednesday, April 4.

34796

How Seismic and Sequence Stratigraphy Have Advanced: 40 Years after AAPG Memoir 26 and 30 Years after SEPM Special Publication 42

In honor of the 100th Anniversary of AAPG, and in recognition of major contributions to the science of basin analysis and worldwide exploration, the ACE 2017 SEPM Annual Symposium will be jointly sponsored by SEPM and AAPG with a focus on the historical contributions, advances in and future of the science of sequence and seismic stratigraphy. This symposium is prompted by the 40th anniversary of the publication of AAPG memoir 26 and SEPM Special Publication 42, both seminal compendiums that captured the rapidly evolving science of basin stratigraphy and global implications for stratigraphic understanding, as well as forging linkages between stratigraphy, sedimentology and geomorphology. The oral session, which includes invited talks from R. Mitchum, K. Bohacs, R. Sarg, H. Posamentier, G. Eberli and a raft of other prominent names in both research and application of these concepts, will be followed the next day with a poster session on the theme on Wednesday, April 4.

Panel_34796 Panel_34796 Theme 12: SEPM-AAPG Research Symposium Tuesday, 04 April, 2017 Tuesday, 04 April, 2017 8:00 AM 11:50 AM http://ace.aapg.org/2017/technical-program/forums-and-special-sessions/theme-12-sepm-aapg-research-symposium

This forum, which celebrates the 100th anniversary of the founding of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, addresses the future challenges of the oil and gas industry to supply the world’s increasing energy needs without compromising global environmental concerns with continued use of fossil fuels. A diverse panel of distinguished speakers will engage in a sobering discussion of the global challenges in transitioning to low carbon energy future.

Speakers Include:

Steven E. Koonin, Professor of Information and Director, NYU Center for Urban Science and Progress, New York University, New York, NY
• Topic: Global Population, Energy Demand, and Future Technology

Cindy Yeilding, Senior Vice President, BP America, Houston, TX
• Topic: Global Petroleum Resources and Transportation Fuel Options

Mark A. Snell, President of Sempra Energy, San Diego, CA
• Topic: The Global Power Fuel Mix and the Carbon Transition

Jesse H. Ausubel, Director of the Program for the Human Environment and Senior Research Associate, Rockefeller University, New York, NY
• Topic: Atmosphere, Air, Land, Water, and Energy Density

Kenneth B. Medlock III, Senior Director, Center for Energy Studies, Baker Institute for Public Policy, Rice University, Houston, TX
• Topic: Energy Diversity, Carbon Tax, and Economic Realities

Scott W. Tinker, Director, Bureau of Economic Geology, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX
• Topic: Global Energy Security and Poverty>

Moderated Panel discussion Follows talks

35052

This forum, which celebrates the 100th anniversary of the founding of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, addresses the future challenges of the oil and gas industry to supply the world’s increasing energy needs without compromising global environmental concerns with continued use of fossil fuels. A diverse panel of distinguished speakers will engage in a sobering discussion of the global challenges in transitioning to low carbon energy future.

Speakers Include:

Steven E. Koonin, Professor of Information and Director, NYU Center for Urban Science and Progress, New York University, New York, NY
• Topic: Global Population, Energy Demand, and Future Technology

Cindy Yeilding, Senior Vice President, BP America, Houston, TX
• Topic: Global Petroleum Resources and Transportation Fuel Options

Mark A. Snell, President of Sempra Energy, San Diego, CA
• Topic: The Global Power Fuel Mix and the Carbon Transition

Jesse H. Ausubel, Director of the Program for the Human Environment and Senior Research Associate, Rockefeller University, New York, NY
• Topic: Atmosphere, Air, Land, Water, and Energy Density

Kenneth B. Medlock III, Senior Director, Center for Energy Studies, Baker Institute for Public Policy, Rice University, Houston, TX
• Topic: Energy Diversity, Carbon Tax, and Economic Realities

Scott W. Tinker, Director, Bureau of Economic Geology, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX
• Topic: Global Energy Security and Poverty>

Moderated Panel discussion Follows talks

Panel_35052 Panel_35052 The Next 100 Years of Global Energy Use: Resources, Impacts and Economics DEG/EMD Tuesday, 04 April, 2017 Tuesday, 04 April, 2017 1:15 PM 5:05 PM http://ace.aapg.org/2017/technical-program/forums-and-special-sessions/the-next-100-years-of-global-energy-use-resources-impacts-and-economics

This forum addresses practical aspects of how the fossil fuel industry should operate in the coming decades based on two key assumptions/ goals. First, availability to energy increases prosperity and well-being of the population as a whole and our industry should strive to furnish it. The second is that policies that restrict any manner of alteration to local or global environments are likely to become more prevalent as technology allows both more detailed measurements and various media allow dissemination of both information and disinformation.

Aspects to be addressed are among the following:

  • What regulatory or economic incentives (e.g., a tax on carbon) would be best for our industry to allow it to both supply the needed energy and to be seen as a positive, creative industry by the public?
  • How should the energy industry prepare its infrastructure for the managing risk better, be it in hazardous environments, in response to weather related accidents, aggradation of cumulative effects, etc.
  • How can our industry better transfer knowledge and best practices between generations and from where will we develop the next generation of skill workers?
  • How do corporations and regulators “bake in” Best Practices for technologies and plays that have not even been imagined.
  • Finally, how can we change public perceptions to view the fossil fuel industry as part of the solution and not just the problem?

Creating a Social Contract to Operate – A Necessity in the Post COP 21 World: Daniel D. Domeracki, Vice President, Government and Industry Relations, Schlumberger Limited

Sub-Surface Injection of Fluids and Induced Seismicity Best Practices: Dr. Jeremy Boak – University of Oklahoma and State Geologist of Oklahoma

Future Best Practices in the Deep Water Offshore: C. R. (Charlie) Williams II, Executive Director, Center for Offshore Safety and Chief Scientist – Well Engineering and Production Technology, Shell

Mitigating Methane Emissions: The Role of Science, Data Transparency and Innovative Technology: David Lyon, Ph.D., Scientist, Environmental Defense Fund, Austin, Texas

Building Social Acceptance and Trust at the Community and National Levels: Alan J. Krupnick, Senior Fellow and Co-Director, Resources for the Future, Center for Energy and Climate Economics, Washington D.C.

Working Together, We Can Have the Energy We Need, the Economy We Want and the Environment We Value: Susan Cunningham, Executive Vice President, Noble Energy

35054

This forum addresses practical aspects of how the fossil fuel industry should operate in the coming decades based on two key assumptions/ goals. First, availability to energy increases prosperity and well-being of the population as a whole and our industry should strive to furnish it. The second is that policies that restrict any manner of alteration to local or global environments are likely to become more prevalent as technology allows both more detailed measurements and various media allow dissemination of both information and disinformation.

Aspects to be addressed are among the following:

  • What regulatory or economic incentives (e.g., a tax on carbon) would be best for our industry to allow it to both supply the needed energy and to be seen as a positive, creative industry by the public?
  • How should the energy industry prepare its infrastructure for the managing risk better, be it in hazardous environments, in response to weather related accidents, aggradation of cumulative effects, etc.
  • How can our industry better transfer knowledge and best practices between generations and from where will we develop the next generation of skill workers?
  • How do corporations and regulators “bake in” Best Practices for technologies and plays that have not even been imagined.
  • Finally, how can we change public perceptions to view the fossil fuel industry as part of the solution and not just the problem?

Creating a Social Contract to Operate – A Necessity in the Post COP 21 World: Daniel D. Domeracki, Vice President, Government and Industry Relations, Schlumberger Limited

Sub-Surface Injection of Fluids and Induced Seismicity Best Practices: Dr. Jeremy Boak – University of Oklahoma and State Geologist of Oklahoma

Future Best Practices in the Deep Water Offshore: C. R. (Charlie) Williams II, Executive Director, Center for Offshore Safety and Chief Scientist – Well Engineering and Production Technology, Shell

Mitigating Methane Emissions: The Role of Science, Data Transparency and Innovative Technology: David Lyon, Ph.D., Scientist, Environmental Defense Fund, Austin, Texas

Building Social Acceptance and Trust at the Community and National Levels: Alan J. Krupnick, Senior Fellow and Co-Director, Resources for the Future, Center for Energy and Climate Economics, Washington D.C.

Working Together, We Can Have the Energy We Need, the Economy We Want and the Environment We Value: Susan Cunningham, Executive Vice President, Noble Energy

Panel_35054 Panel_35054 DEG/DPA Forum: The Future Best Practices for Extraction Industries in a Lower Carbon Environment Wednesday, 05 April, 2017 Wednesday, 05 April, 2017 8:00 AM 11:50 AM http://www.aapg.org/details-page/Articleid/35054/deg-dpa-forum-the-future-best-practices-for-extraction-industries-in-a-lower-carbon-environment

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