100 Years of Science
Fueling 100 Years of Prosperity

ACE2017 Preservation of Geoscience Data Display pflist

The Preservation of Geoscience Data Committee (PGDC) was formed to facilitate discussion about preserving geoscience data accumulated through oil and gas exploration and production. Companies spend millions of dollars commissioning, purchasing and accumulating data during the exploration and production cycle, but for various reasons then commonly have trouble spending a small fraction of that cost preserving and maintaining this data. In difficult times companies seeking to reduce costs will look to their data repositories where the cores, cuttings, paper, film and digital archives are stored and try to reduce costs. Paper and film can be scanned, digital data re-mastered onto higher capacity storage media, but there is little that can be done to reduce the space required for cores, cuttings and other physical samples. Gifts of these collections to universities, geological surveys and societies, and federal repositories, merely shift the burden of storage and management to organisations already under intense financial pressure and limited space.

To highlight the benefits and challenges of storing and maintaining data and to help celebrate AAPG’s 100th Anniversary, the PGDC has organised a display at this year’s AAPG ACE Convention to demonstrate a range of core material and data/media taken from the last 100 years of oil and gas exploration.

Cores

The PGDC core display organised by committee member Beverly Blakeney DeJarnett, has been arranged specifically to demonstrate cores representing the many and varied reservoir types (including continental and marine sandstones, carbonates, tar sands, and oil “shales”) represent some of the major oil and gas discoveries over the last 70 years. Such a historically impressive and educational array of samples would not be possible without the dedication and commitment of organisations that preserve and maintain these collections for posterity. Only by being able to study and learn from these analogues from the past can we hope to understand and predict where the reservoirs of the future will be.

Data/Media

Over the last 100 years the way in which data has been collected, displayed and stored has changed dramatically. Early hand-written lithology logs and strip logs have given way to an ever-increasing variety of tools and techniques for measuring and visualising the rocks in the subsurface. Analog methods of recording wireline, seismic and other remote sensing tools gave way to digital and the resulting explosion in data volumes. This, in turn, has led to a demand for greater storage capacity media as more sophisticated techniques led to MBs, GBs, TBs and even PBs of data being generated for a single seismic survey. Today we are familiar with memory sticks holding GBs of data but only 30 years ago the launch of the CD-ROM holding a mere 650Mbs astonished the world where floppy disks and cumbersome magnetic tapes and cartridges were all there were. The bewildering array of innovative solutions resulted in an entire industry bent of transferring data from one media to another to reduce space but also to keep abreast of changing technology. Who amongst us still has a 9-track tape drive which was once as common in the workplace as a DVD drive is today.

The display the PGDC presents demonstrates to a new and unfamiliar generation how things used to be and what limitations geoscientists faced

35056

The Preservation of Geoscience Data Committee (PGDC) was formed to facilitate discussion about preserving geoscience data accumulated through oil and gas exploration and production. Companies spend millions of dollars commissioning, purchasing and accumulating data during the exploration and production cycle, but for various reasons then commonly have trouble spending a small fraction of that cost preserving and maintaining this data. In difficult times companies seeking to reduce costs will look to their data repositories where the cores, cuttings, paper, film and digital archives are stored and try to reduce costs. Paper and film can be scanned, digital data re-mastered onto higher capacity storage media, but there is little that can be done to reduce the space required for cores, cuttings and other physical samples. Gifts of these collections to universities, geological surveys and societies, and federal repositories, merely shift the burden of storage and management to organisations already under intense financial pressure and limited space.

To highlight the benefits and challenges of storing and maintaining data and to help celebrate AAPG’s 100th Anniversary, the PGDC has organised a display at this year’s AAPG ACE Convention to demonstrate a range of core material and data/media taken from the last 100 years of oil and gas exploration.

Cores

The PGDC core display organised by committee member Beverly Blakeney DeJarnett, has been arranged specifically to demonstrate cores representing the many and varied reservoir types (including continental and marine sandstones, carbonates, tar sands, and oil “shales”) represent some of the major oil and gas discoveries over the last 70 years. Such a historically impressive and educational array of samples would not be possible without the dedication and commitment of organisations that preserve and maintain these collections for posterity. Only by being able to study and learn from these analogues from the past can we hope to understand and predict where the reservoirs of the future will be.

Data/Media

Over the last 100 years the way in which data has been collected, displayed and stored has changed dramatically. Early hand-written lithology logs and strip logs have given way to an ever-increasing variety of tools and techniques for measuring and visualising the rocks in the subsurface. Analog methods of recording wireline, seismic and other remote sensing tools gave way to digital and the resulting explosion in data volumes. This, in turn, has led to a demand for greater storage capacity media as more sophisticated techniques led to MBs, GBs, TBs and even PBs of data being generated for a single seismic survey. Today we are familiar with memory sticks holding GBs of data but only 30 years ago the launch of the CD-ROM holding a mere 650Mbs astonished the world where floppy disks and cumbersome magnetic tapes and cartridges were all there were. The bewildering array of innovative solutions resulted in an entire industry bent of transferring data from one media to another to reduce space but also to keep abreast of changing technology. Who amongst us still has a 9-track tape drive which was once as common in the workplace as a DVD drive is today.

The display the PGDC presents demonstrates to a new and unfamiliar generation how things used to be and what limitations geoscientists faced

Panel_35056 Panel_35056 Preservation of Geoscience Data Display Monday, 03 April, 2017 Monday, 03 April, 2017 9:00 AM 6:00 PM

Subscribe now to receive valuable updates, important dates and deadlines from ACE

All fields required
Subscribe Me!
Questions? Please contact:
Terri Duncan
Technical Programs Coordinator
+1 918 560 2641