Channels are conduits through which fluids, sediment (suspended and bed-load) and dissolved loads are transported across the Earth surface. Their general geomorphologic expression is comparable similar in terrestrial, submarine and extraterrestrial environments; however, formative sedimentary processes can be fundamentally different. For example, sinuosity and aspect ratio tend to be similar; however, submarine channels tend to be larger than fluvial channels and the stratigraphic records of fluvial and submarine channel deposits can be different. A key research challenge is the link between the geomorphic expression and stratigraphic record of channels. Rivers are more accessible to direct monitoring compared to submarine channels and the link between fluvial geomorphology and stratigraphy is better understood. In the case of submarine channels, we commonly rely on the stratigraphic record to inform insights about formative processes and evolution.

Channels are conduits through which fluids, sediment (suspended and bed-load) and dissolved loads are transported across the Earth surface. Their general geomorphologic expression is comparable similar in terrestrial, submarine and extraterrestrial environments; however, formative sedimentary processes can be fundamentally different. For example, sinuosity and aspect ratio tend to be similar; however, submarine channels tend to be larger than fluvial channels and the stratigraphic records of fluvial and submarine channel deposits can be different. A key research challenge is the link between the geomorphic expression and stratigraphic record of channels. Rivers are more accessible to direct monitoring compared to submarine channels and the link between fluvial geomorphology and stratigraphy is better understood. In the case of submarine channels, we commonly rely on the stratigraphic record to inform insights about formative processes and evolution.

Panel_14420 Panel_14420 8:00 AM 11:50 AM
Paul "Mitch" Harris hails from West Virginia University where he earned his BS and MS in Geology. Mitch migrated to the University of Miami, for his PhD where he focused on the sequence of modern sediments. Mitch joined Getty Oil briefly then Gulf Oil until they merged with Chevron and Mitch moved to California. Mitch has spent his career thus far linking modern and ancient systems and has worked everything from the Permian Basin to Super Giants like Tengiz, while making countless trips to the modern to teach, ask questions, observe and apply concepts to the subsurface. Mitch is adjunct professor at the University of Miami and Rice. In 2010-2011, Mitch served as President of SEPM, and he’s been awarded SEPM Honorary Membership, Honorary Life Award from PBSEPM, AAPG Honorary Membership, Wallace E. Pratt Memorial Award, Robert H.Dott, Sr. Memorial Award twice and John W. Shelton Search & Discovery Award.

Paul "Mitch" Harris hails from West Virginia University where he earned his BS and MS in Geology. Mitch migrated to the University of Miami, for his PhD where he focused on the sequence of modern sediments. Mitch joined Getty Oil briefly then Gulf Oil until they merged with Chevron and Mitch moved to California. Mitch has spent his career thus far linking modern and ancient systems and has worked everything from the Permian Basin to Super Giants like Tengiz, while making countless trips to the modern to teach, ask questions, observe and apply concepts to the subsurface. Mitch is adjunct professor at the University of Miami and Rice. In 2010-2011, Mitch served as President of SEPM, and he’s been awarded SEPM Honorary Membership, Honorary Life Award from PBSEPM, AAPG Honorary Membership, Wallace E. Pratt Memorial Award, Robert H.Dott, Sr. Memorial Award twice and John W. Shelton Search & Discovery Award.

Panel_14392 Panel_14392 1:15 PM 5:05 PM
Channels are conduits through which fluids, sediment (suspended and bed-load) and dissolved loads are transported across the Earth surface. Their general geomorphologic expression is comparable similar in terrestrial, submarine and extraterrestrial environments; however, formative sedimentary processes can be fundamentally different. For example, sinuosity and aspect ratio tend to be similar; however, submarine channels tend to be larger than fluvial channels and the stratigraphic records of fluvial and submarine channel deposits can be different. A key research challenge is the link between the geomorphic expression and stratigraphic record of channels. Rivers are more accessible to direct monitoring compared to submarine channels and the link between fluvial geomorphology and stratigraphy is better understood. In the case of submarine channels, we commonly rely on the stratigraphic record to inform insights about formative processes and evolution.

Channels are conduits through which fluids, sediment (suspended and bed-load) and dissolved loads are transported across the Earth surface. Their general geomorphologic expression is comparable similar in terrestrial, submarine and extraterrestrial environments; however, formative sedimentary processes can be fundamentally different. For example, sinuosity and aspect ratio tend to be similar; however, submarine channels tend to be larger than fluvial channels and the stratigraphic records of fluvial and submarine channel deposits can be different. A key research challenge is the link between the geomorphic expression and stratigraphic record of channels. Rivers are more accessible to direct monitoring compared to submarine channels and the link between fluvial geomorphology and stratigraphy is better understood. In the case of submarine channels, we commonly rely on the stratigraphic record to inform insights about formative processes and evolution.

Panel_14421 Panel_14421 1:15 PM 5:05 PM
A panel including representatives from the Department of Energy (DOE), academia, industry and national lab will explain the planned subsurface research initiative and solicit feedback on fundamental and applied research needs. The subsurface provides a majority of the world’s energy and offers great potential for CO2, nuclear waste and energy storage. Despite decades of research, and recent successes in new extraction methods, subsurface energy resources overall are underutilized and environmental risks are not well integrated into strategies. The U.S. DOE and National Laboratories are advancing an innovative crosscutting Subsurface Initiative, focused on revolutionizing sustainable subsurface energy production and storage. This challenge will require transformational improvements in our ability to access, characterize, predict and adaptively manipulate fracture and flow processes over scales ranging from nanometers to kilometers. This town hall will describe and solicit community feedback on the initiative research priorities.

A panel including representatives from the Department of Energy (DOE), academia, industry and national lab will explain the planned subsurface research initiative and solicit feedback on fundamental and applied research needs.

The subsurface provides a majority of the world’s energy and offers great potential for CO2, nuclear waste and energy storage. Despite decades of research, and recent successes in new extraction methods, subsurface energy resources overall are underutilized and environmental risks are not well integrated into strategies. The U.S. DOE and National Laboratories are advancing an innovative crosscutting Subsurface Initiative, focused on revolutionizing sustainable subsurface energy production and storage. This challenge will require transformational improvements in our ability to access, characterize, predict and adaptively manipulate fracture and flow processes over scales ranging from nanometers to kilometers. This town hall will describe and solicit community feedback on the initiative research priorities.

Panel_14252 Panel_14252 5:10 PM 6:40 PM
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